Prampram, Prampram, Prampram – brief memories of Achimota School

Prampram, Prampram, Prampram – brief memories of Achimota School
By oberserber
Prampram, Prampram, Prampram. Here we are now. In front of me is the sea, behind me is the town. No swimming and no going to town. Those words spoken by Mr Galevo, our cadet master at the time who subsequently became my Young Pioneer master were for me the defining moment in 60s Achimota.

I had been to camp before, a scouts camp at the Shai Hills when our senior scout leader spent the best time carrying me on his shoulders, but that was three years before. This was the real thing a cadet camp and we had real soldiers to take us through our map reading, our rifle training and our drills. And oh yes there were the fights and the escaping to town despite the warnings and of course swimming in water that caused bilharzia for most of us. The final humiliation for me after that camp was going home, walking through the streets of Lagos Town with my head held high, marching home like the soldier that I quite was not and having my grandmother strip off all my clothes and scrubbing me down because she could just not believe how dirty I looked and how foul I smelt.

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Prampram, Prampram, Prampram – brief memories of Achimota School

Prampram, Prampram, Prampram. Here we are now. In front of me is the sea, behind me is the town. No swimming and no going to town. Those words spoken by Mr Galevo, our cadet master at the time who subsequently became my Young Pioneer master were for me the defining moment in 60s Achimota.

I had been to camp before, a scouts camp at the Shai Hills when our senior scout leader spent the best time carrying me on his shoulders, but that was three years before. This was the real thing a cadet camp and we had real soldiers to take us through our map reading, our rifle training and our drills. And oh yes there were the fights and the escaping to town despite the warnings and of course swimming in water that caused bilharzia for most of us. The final humiliation for me after that camp was going home, walking through the streets of Lagos Town with my head held high, marching home like the soldier that I quite was not and having my grandmother strip off all my clothes and scrubbing me down because she could just not believe how dirty I looked and how foul I smelt.

Most of my memories about Achimota school border on the salacious and I am not sure how much I can reveal with libel suits against me but I will try to be at my most discreet in this short piece.

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Supporting Entrepreneurial Activity in Ghana – 1993

I am trying to bring together all these articles That i have written over the years to this site

I wrote this article long ago and i suspect that my views may have changed.  It was in response to a challenge from Sydney Casely Hayford who was always bugging me about writing something.

Focus this Month – Business in Ghana – July 1993
Supporting Entrepreneurial Activity
When political freedom is disturbed in Africa it is often because of economic Issues. We find that most organisers of coup d’etat give economic mismanagement as one of the main reasons why they take over governments. Other reasons are corruption and misuse of government power for economic benefit. Economic prosperity is therefore an issue for the maintenance of democracy since stability in the economy will leave disaffected army officers without a good enough reason to disrupt the democratic process.

http://equinoxconsulting.net/Articles/Supporting%20entrepreneurial%20activity.pdf

The main premise of the article is that for African countries and Ghana in particular to ensure economic growth with stability the governments will need to entourage true entrepreneurial development. Governments should completely free the the micro-economic from their control and meddling. Government has a role to play, but that role is not direct involvement in he productive sectors.

I hope that this conceptual article will stimulate debate on the issues raised in it. It is being written by a Ghanaian abroad who is also looking for answers to the lack of entrepreneurial development in Ghana.

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To the victor, ALL the spoils

I wrote this after the December 2000 elections. I did not provide advice for President Atta Mills when he took over in 2008.  I will find time to provide some advice to President John Mahama, but i will wait till after he has made all his appointments.

My view of multiparty politics is that it must be adversarial and that the winner in a Presidential race deserves the space to make his own appointments and to run the country the way he sees fit because the people have given him the mandate.  Fortunately sitting in far away England, i do not know those who President Mahama is appointing; i hope they are competent and I hope that he would make a final break from the Provisional National Defence Council.

 

kufu676ytror2

To the victor, ALL the spoils

http://sil.ghanaweb.com/r.php?thread=93104

New Topic | Go to Top | Go to Topic | Search | Archive | Register Previous Message | Next Message Subject: To the Victor, ALL the spoils Author: Ade Sawyerr (anchor-04.www-cache.demon.co.uk)

Date: 01-02-2001 07:18

To the victor, ALL the spoils

A government of national unity will be a retrogressive step for democracy in Ghana.

Despite what some of us wrote against the NPP it being an Asante Party, and against Kuffour, he being not ready to rule the country, the people of Ghana have spoken and comprehensively voted against the NDC in this election.

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The Al Magrahi rumpus–what is it all about?

The Al Magrahi rumpus – what is it all about?

Ade Sawyerr © London, August 2009

I sat through a 25 minute long speech by the Scottish Justice Minister Kenny Mackaskill that justified the release of Al-Magrahi, the man convicted of the Lockerbie bombing and wondered why this justification had to be carried live on television.  Then I watched the white ‘black maria van’ whisk him out of jail to the airport, saw him board a plane to Libya and just wondered why this circus was being made public.

Now it turns out that Prime Minister Gordon Brown had written to Mummar Ghadafi about the release of this high profile prisoner who had been subject to so much political and diplomatic negotiation even before he was tried.  First Secretary Mandleson subsequently wades in to suggest that there was no deal relating to the release and that the trade mission promised was in no way part of the deal to release the prisoner.  I then hear that Prince Andrew was meant to lead the trade delegation to Libya on the 40th anniversary of the violent coup d’état that overthrew the established monarchy in Libya.  Ex Prime Minister Tony Blair, who cannot stay out of the limelight, waxed lyrical on why Libya needs to be brought back from the cold and that though there was no deal, it was not such a bad deal to have released the guy.

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Bruce Road, Jamestown British Accra

Bruce Road, Jamestown British Accra

By kpaikpaanyo

My good friend Thomas Jefferson will not forgive me for continuing to use the word Accra.  He is right, there is no word called Accra in the Ga language but we have moved along culturally with the integration and assimilation of people from different places.  The beauty of it all is that there is a Jamestown smack in the middle of Accra that most people who live in Accra do not know.

But it was in Jamestown that we all grew up and it was in Jamestown that our navels were cut and buried and so we continue gravitating towards Jamestown.  For me it is to the home of my maternal grandfather that I celebrate the Ga Homowo, but since I am so blest I am also privileged to go the house of my paternal grand uncle’s house at Krobo in Teshie.

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