History of JamesTown British Accra

By- Nat Nuno-Amarteifio, Former Mayor of Accra , Architect and Historian

Palace of Nii Kojo Ababio
Palace of Nii Kojo Ababio

**This piece was originally posted on this blog under the title ‘the definitive story of JamesTown British Accra.  The pictures accompanying the original posting have been changed in this one***

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We must begin at the beginning. Carl Reindorf in his history of the Gold Coast and Asante popularized the idea that the Ga originated from ancient Egypt or possibly ancient Israel. Modern historians and archeologists such as Paul Ozame, Irene Odotei, James Anguandah, Adu Boahen and John Parker reject this thesis. Irene Odotei believes that the Ga originated from the lower banks of the Volta River. They travelled in family or clan groups and settled in the hills overlooking the Accra plains. The Accra plains were dotted with lagoons and rivers, rich with fish and salt. These two commodities together with agriculture became the basis of Accra’s early peasant economy. The Ga developed a trade relationship with the nations in the rich forest belt. Their neighbors the Akwamu, the Akyem and later the Asante traded with the Ga with whom they exchanged gold, slaves and forest products for salt and fish.

Continue reading “History of JamesTown British Accra”

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The Definitive Story of James Town British Accra by Nat Nuno-Amarteifio

   The Definitive Story of James Town British Accra by Nat Nuno-Amarteifio

Mantse Agbonaa – The Kings Palace

We must begin at the beginning. Carl Reindorf in his history of the Gold Coast and Asante popularized the idea that the Ga originated from ancient Egypt or possibly ancient Israel. Modern historians and archeologists such as Paul Ozame, Irene Odotei, James Anguandah, Adu Boahen and John Parker reject this thesis. Irene Odotei believes that the Ga originated from the lower banks of the Volta River. They travelled in family or clan groups and settled in the hills overlooking the Accra plains. The Accra plains were dotted with lagoons and rivers, rich with fish and salt. These two commodities together with agriculture became the basis of Accra’s early peasant economy. The Ga developed a trade relationship with the nations in the rich forest belt. Their neighbors the Akwamu, the Akyem and later the Asante traded with the Ga with whom they exchanged gold, slaves and forest products for salt and fish.

Continue reading “The Definitive Story of James Town British Accra by Nat Nuno-Amarteifio”