Accra! Love it or Leave it – to Asase on Ga anti-Ashanti Xenophobia

Accra! Love it or Leave it – to Asase on Ga anti-Ashanti Xenophobia

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I was recently forwarded a piece posted by good friend Asase on Say it Loud http://sil.ghanaweb.com/r.php?thread=11824875 and titled ‘What fuels the anti Asante xenophobia among Gamei’. He writes

“The purpose of this short essay is …… the visceral xenophobic jingoism that many Gamei tend to exhibit towards the Asante. I have known Gamei of all clans all my life.  From Nungua to Mashie and everything in between, I have connections to al of them.  My bossom friend is from Nungua.  Individually, one couldn’t have a better friend than a Ganyo. On this small forum, Gamei like Bikome, Otu, Wole, the late Commodore, Ataa Lankwei, on their own alone are all great chaps.  Of course, there are individual Ga rascals but overall individually, they are superb.  The problem is when they come together as a people. That is when the stupidity commences.”

My short response is that there is no anti-Asante Xenophobia and if there were, the fault is not with the Ga

Continue reading “Accra! Love it or Leave it – to Asase on Ga anti-Ashanti Xenophobia”

The Story of Adedainkpo in Old Accra

Migration, Urbanisation and Evolving identities – The Story of Adedainkpo in Old Accra

By Gilbert Nii-Okai Addy December 2012

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Adedainkpo in Old Accra – not many Ghanaians would know this today – was for over one hundred and fifty years, from the early 1800s to perhaps the 1950s , where nearly anyone who was anyone among the native African elite in the Gold Coast lived. It was for that entire period, effectively most of the British colonial period, the equivalent of East Legon in the scheme of the Accra of today. It was veritably the centre of economic, social , cultural and intellectual life in Accra and the British Gold Coast colony.
One may be able to catch a glimpse of this glorious history by the scale of most of the now sadly crumbling grand houses there. The houses were even bigger in some parts of Korle Wokon firther down Hansen Road from the Wesley Methodist Church and towards the old UTC Katamanto area.

Housing for most people in nearly all of the colonial Gold Coast during would have been most rudimentary – mud huts, ta few wooden or concrete houses and the like at best.

Adedainkpo , was where most of the educated elite of Accra and the Gold Coast lived and the entire area , before the later development of Adabraka and Kaneshie, was the economic, social and cultural heart of Accra.
In my primary school in Accra in the 1960s, although many if not most of the Ghanaian pupils there and then could trace their origins to Adedainkpo, I was the only one who physically lived at there because I lived with my grandmother as my own parents were out of Ghana for much of that time. As such I got to know the area very intimately. Now what most of my friends and colleagues knew as my grandmother’s house was and still is i in fact not her house at all but her great grand parents house. Yes, the house was originally owned by my grandmother’s own great grandparents. So I actually grew up in a family house in which I was in fact something like a sixth or even seventh generation resident, which coming to think of, is actually quite interesting. My roots in the area go back several generations.Now what , one may ask, is the import of all this ? Continue reading “The Story of Adedainkpo in Old Accra”

Bruce Road, Jamestown British Accra

Bruce Road, Jamestown British Accra

By kpaikpaanyo

My good friend Thomas Jefferson will not forgive me for continuing to use the word Accra.  He is right, there is no word called Accra in the Ga language but we have moved along culturally with the integration and assimilation of people from different places.  The beauty of it all is that there is a Jamestown smack in the middle of Accra that most people who live in Accra do not know.

But it was in Jamestown that we all grew up and it was in Jamestown that our navels were cut and buried and so we continue gravitating towards Jamestown.  For me it is to the home of my maternal grandfather that I celebrate the Ga Homowo, but since I am so blest I am also privileged to go the house of my paternal grand uncle’s house at Krobo in Teshie.

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