Accra! Love it or Leave it – to Asase on Ga anti-Ashanti Xenophobia

Accra! Love it or Leave it – to Asase on Ga anti-Ashanti Xenophobia

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I was recently forwarded a piece posted by good friend Asase on Say it Loud http://sil.ghanaweb.com/r.php?thread=11824875 and titled ‘What fuels the anti Asante xenophobia among Gamei’. He writes

“The purpose of this short essay is …… the visceral xenophobic jingoism that many Gamei tend to exhibit towards the Asante. I have known Gamei of all clans all my life.  From Nungua to Mashie and everything in between, I have connections to al of them.  My bossom friend is from Nungua.  Individually, one couldn’t have a better friend than a Ganyo. On this small forum, Gamei like Bikome, Otu, Wole, the late Commodore, Ataa Lankwei, on their own alone are all great chaps.  Of course, there are individual Ga rascals but overall individually, they are superb.  The problem is when they come together as a people. That is when the stupidity commences.”

My short response is that there is no anti-Asante Xenophobia and if there were, the fault is not with the Ga

Continue reading “Accra! Love it or Leave it – to Asase on Ga anti-Ashanti Xenophobia”

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Homowo – Asafotufiam – Nmaayem, 14th September 2013 at Colliers Wood

How time flies, how the years roll by, how things change but the time for annual renewal is even more critical.
25 years is a long time in the history of a country and for an organisation to celebrate 25 years of unbroken association and service to the community is definitely an achievement that cannot be understated, so it is with some pride that i invite you the 25 years of our organisation celebrating our festival in London.
i can still remember that rainy October day in 1988, at the Higbury Roundhouse in London when a group of Gadangme people decided that we had to meet to continue with the celebration of our major cultural festival and to plant the seeds that would ensure continuity for the next generation of Gadangme in the Diaspora.
so there were several meetings, but like everything Gadangme, there were disagreements and instead of one Homowo celebration as originally planned there were two, one at a hall in Ladbroke Grove earlier in the September of 1988.  But  even in disagreement the vision for a self sustaining educational and welfare organisation emerged and we delayed our celebration till October and what a time we had even on that rainy day. Continue reading “Homowo – Asafotufiam – Nmaayem, 14th September 2013 at Colliers Wood”

A Ga New Year Greeting

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Afi oo Afi
Afi naa akpe wɔ
Kpaanyɔ anina wɔ
Wɔ fee momoo
Wɔ ye Gbo, wɔ ye Gbiena
Alonte diŋ ko akafo wɔteŋ
Ni wɔsεε afi lε wɔ tashi neke noŋŋ
Ni wɔsεε afi le ehi eha wo fe neke
Ni nyemi afee nyemi
Ni afi aya ni ebanina wɔ ekoŋ

Tswa ni omanye abla wɔ!

…. and the imperfect English translation!

Hail to the New year
May we live to see the end of the New Year
May the eighth day meet with us
So that we are as good as new
May we celebrate the Gbo festival of September and the Gbeina festival of May
Let no black cat, a symbol of evi,l cross our paths
And let us be around to sit together in the next year
and that we may be more prosperous
Bound with sisterly and brotherly love
As the year goes round to meet us again
That when we strike may glory surround us

What is Christianity?

I was searching through a file my late father kept for me when i started secondary school. It included in the main receipts for payments that he had made during the period of the sixties and also my less than impressive school reports, a source of much aggravation during the holiday period when he sought to ground me and further pay for me to have extra classes.
I had retrieved this file from the family home the last time i traveled back home. i was surprised that there was a manuscript of a book dating back to the late 1930s that Mr EA Ammah the major authority on Ga culture had put together. I suspect that he must have been asked to review it.
I reproduce the document here for information. Scanning foolscap to A4 is not an easy task at all and it has taken me the best part of the morning to scan these 23 pages.
It is a long read, but it it a good read if you are interested in the vexed question of how the missionaries and the educated Ga sought to trample on our customs in the name of Christianity.
What comes across is that there was a conspiracy of sorts that in order for the word of Christ to be spread among the natives, it was important to turn their educated away from their culture. Sadly the same is happening today with several men of God of different sects, titles and hierarchies pronouncing on the culture of our people.
Mr EA Ammah was bold enough in 1939 to take them on in relation to our festivals and the Homowo.
I hope that other scholarly tracts would surface to inform this debate.
I also think that organisations such as Gadangme Nikasemo Asafo should bring a certain urgency to the work and help preserve some of these tracts for posterity.
Read on!!!!

WHAT IS CHRISTIANITY